Parts of an Arthropod, Alison’s Montessori

  • Zoology, 6-9
  • Abundant in nature, these little creatures are one of the most accessible animals to children. Arthropods represent the largest phylum of the animal kingdom, and can be classified in 4 groups: insects, arachnids, myriapods, and crustaceans. Arthropods can be found in all parts of the world, and in any climatic condition. And what do all arthropods have in common? They have a segmented body, jointed limbs, an exoskeleton made of chitin, well-developed sense organs, a central nervous system, and they are bilaterally symmetrical. Let’s look closely at the beautiful puzzle Parts of an Arthropod, and Parts of an Arthropod Nomenclature by Alison’s Montessori, which has ignited the work on arthropods once more.

Materials

  • 1 wooden puzzle of the Parts of an Arthropod.
  • 1 control chart for the puzzle
  • 28 picture cards for nomenclature work
  • 28 description cards with close test
  • 28 labels to match to pictures or close tests cards
  • 1 blackline master copy (arthropod diagram) to label and color
  • 1 control chart for the nomenclature
  • 1 booklet to control the cards work

How it works

Parts of an Arthropod Puzzle

  • My learner is a 7 year old in Lower Elementary. We are in the constant process of revisiting science charts that cover the major phyla in all domains. Yesterday, he revisited the “Molluscs,” and today the “Arthropods.”. This is our framework.
Puzzle and Chart. We love to have our plastic specimens out
  • I introduced the topic using our book “Explanatorium Nature.” The book contains stunning close-up pictures, and cool facts, nothing overwhelming.
  • We looked at our compartmentalized box full of plastic insects, and sorted them. We left out what we thought was not an arthropod. We decided that the bee looked similar to a fly, and invited it to the lesson.
A Specimen Helps with Proportions
  • The field was prepared, we started by labeling the puzzle using the control chart. This looked very familiar (primary zoology puzzle). The puzzle is so precisely cut, with intricate parts, we were able to see exactly where the ocelli, sound receptors are.
Wooden Labels and Puzzles to Match
Done Matching
  • Working with a puzzle and its parts really helps organize the concept. After getting familiar with the parts of an arthropod, it is really a unique experience to be able to pull apart the concept, and isolate its parts to label them.
Undoing the Puzzle with a Purpose: Matching to Labels
Parts to Labels Matching

Parts of an Arthropod Nomenclature

  • Working with nomenclature materials provide an opportunity for children to practice and develop their literacy skills.
Nomenclature Cards – 6-9
  • There are many possibilities to work with the nomenclature set. After reading the booklet, you can:
  • -match the pictures and labels
  • -match the labeled descriptions and pictures
  • -match the labeled pictures and descriptions
  • -match the close tests (blank) and the labels
  • -match the closet tests, pictures and labels
  • -color and label the blackline (diagram)
  • -complete the workbook
Parts of an Arthropod Puzzle & Parts of an Arthropod Nomenclature (Set)

Next time children encounter an arthropod, they will be keen observer, with a much more appreciative eye. I hope you enjoyed discovering this material in detail. Enjoy more pictures below!

A bumble bee we found this week
I use this photo box to store my cards and labels

Disclosure: this experience was made possible thanks to Alison’s Montessori for having the confidence in their house-made products, and letting us try the puzzle at no cost, with no requirement on my part. I do write unbiased honest reviews, because I only write about products that work for us.

Extension Work – Workbook, a Favorite!

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